Expertise

Slide2

Education:

David has a doctorate in management sciences from one of the top business schools in the United Kingdom, where he had the good fortune to be the first Ph.D. student of Professor Sir Cary Cooper, the renowned social scientist recently named as one of the “top five thinkers” in HR worldwide.  David’s emphasis during these years was organizational psychology.

Applications:

Understanding the history of management, and how it has evolved (and will always have to) to embrace newer, much more democratic concepts such as flatter structures, self directed work teams and engagement in the workplace;  understanding what makes some managers “great” and others the “boss from hell”.

Slide3

Education:

While some people approach engagement and work culture from a communications perspective, and this is valuable, the basis for much that shapes these aspects of work life is psychology.  David gained a thorough understanding of this field while studying at the University of Southampton, and received a B.Sc. (Honors) in the subject.

Applications:

Applying psychology to the workplace, with the many insights which it provides, including understanding emotional factors in engagement at work;  how different work cultures develop and trigger reactions in the workforce;  what makes people choose to engage or not, regardless of culture (for example, personality);  understanding how management values and behavior affect culture; understanding how people bring their past relationships to work, with good or bad results.

Slide4

Education:

With the increasingly important focus of metrics in human resource management, a background in research is essential to understand the field.  David’s psychology degree was a typical UK “tunnel vision” immersion into research methodologies, statistics, psychometrics and all the things which must find their way into well designed employee surveys, for example.   Additionally his Ph.D. work consisted of three years of research.

Applications:

Employee opinion surveys, engagement data analysis, work culture analysis; knowing how to use this data to identify high performance units and individual managers inside the organization;  merging external data such as customer satisfaction with employee morale/engagement results.  Click here to see more on mining survey data.

Slide5

Experience:

From his early days as a management consultant,  David recognized the importance of learning “outside the box” of his academic training, for example about business strategy and other leadership challenges as the context in which culture develops and affects worker engagement; ultimately these factors determine whether the organization achieves its mission.  Much of what he has learned over a long career with many clients is not taught in “silo-like” and “ivory tower” academic environments but is essential to being a value-added resource to leaders.

Applications:

Placing work culture and engagement of workers in the context of the business strategy and all the many organizational factors which affect them;  knowing that while a culture which works for Google does not work for operating a nuclear power plant, there are best practices applicable to both.